Heat Flux From Below Melts Ice Sheets, Drives Temperatures & CO2 Variations

Antarctic-Temps-High-Geothermal-Heat-Flux-Correlation

CO2 is 400 ppm over the parts of Antarctic that are warming and 400 ppm over the parts of Antarctica that are cooling. There is no way for CO2 to be causing that temperature differential. Additionally, CO2 cannot melt ice from below, it can only melt ice on the surface facing the atmosphere. While CO2 and warming don’t correlate, volcanos and warming do correlate precisely. News flash to all Climate Alarmists, CO2 doesn’t cause volcanic eruptions. Volcanos are melting the Antarctic ice, not CO2. BTW, unlike CO2, volcanos can also warm water and melt glaciers from below.

Considering the magnitude of heat energy required to melt polar ice sheets from below, and that central Antarctica’s air temperatures average about -55°C year-round, it should not be surprising that a significant portion of the meltwater flow from both polar ice sheets (Greenland and Antarctica) is derived from “heat flow from the deep Earth”.

Here is another article on the topic. Funny how the Climate Alarmists never mention that the Greenland Glacier is placed upon a volcano.

Melting at the base of the Greenland ice sheet explained by Iceland hotspot history

It has been argued that basal ice melt is due to the anomalously high geothermal flux1, 4 that has also influenced the development of the longest ice stream in Greenland1. Here we estimate the geothermal flux beneath the Greenland ice sheet and identify a 1,200-km-long and 400-km-wide geothermal anomaly beneath the thick ice cover. We suggest that this anomaly explains the observed melting of the ice sheet’s base,

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